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Monolithic transistors

Researchers develop graphene silicon carbide transistors for high performance electronics.

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Structurally flexible silicene integrated with Si wafers

As the Si counterpart of graphene, silicene is an atom-thick, ultimately thin, two-dimensional crystal of silicon. A team of researchers at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology has succeeded in preparing silicene on Si wafers via a ceramic zirconium diboride buffer layer, paving the way for an integration of silicene with existing Si-based technologies that intrinsically face limits with top-down approaches.

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Flattened nanotubes are full of potential

Rice University researchers reveal details of ‘closed-edge graphene nanoribbons’.

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This Week in Science

Slide and Find | Master Regulator | Straining Suspended Graphene | A Spike Inside the Dome | From Wnt Signals to Telomerase Activity | Exploiting Defects in a Jam | No More Fusion Confusion | Cavity-Induced Minimum | Tropical Carbon Loss | Plants That Eat Animals | No Crossing Over | Blasting Through

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Thinner than a pencil trace

Energy-efficient, high-speed electronics on a nanoscale and screens for mobile telephones and computers that are so thin they can be rolled up. Just a couple of examples of what the super-material graphene could give us. But is European industry up to making these visions a reality?

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‘Nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage

Researchers have created a coaxial nanocable capacitor that outperforms previously reported microcapacitors. The three-layer, 100-nanometer-wide cable was produced with techniques pioneered in the nascent graphene field and could be used to build next-generation energy-storage systems.

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This Week in Science

Designer Hydrogels | Quantum Leap? | Unseen Planet | Dissecting Cooper Pairs | Updating the Triode with Graphene | Variation on a Theme | Going Up Against the Grain Boundaries | Untangling a Spectral Thicket | See How They Grow | Design and Build | Dissecting Chitin Binding | The Real McCoy | So Selective | Regaining Limb Movement | Managing Trade-Offs | Insights into Amyloidogenesis | Predicting Catastrophic Collapse

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Editors’ Choice

Ecology: The Power of Pollination | Education: Automate to Educate | Physiology: Working on Borrowed Time | Applied Physics: Graphene’s Plasmon Prospects

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New research could mean faster computers and better smart phones

Graphene and carbon nanotubes could improve the electronics used in computers and mobile phones, reveals new research.

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First atomic-scale real-time movies of platinum nanocrystal growth in liquids (w/video)

Berkeley scientists create graphene liquid cells for electron microscopy studies of nanocrystal formation.

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