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Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams syndrome

In a study of mice, neuroscientists have found that impaired myelination underlies the hypersociability seen in patients with Williams syndrome.

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Advance in CAR T-cell therapy eliminates severe side effects

An advance in the cancer treatment known as CAR T-cell therapy appears to eliminate its severe side effects, making the treatment safer and potentially available in outpatient settings.

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Snake-inspired robot slithers even better than predecessor

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new and improved snake-inspired soft robot that is faster and more precise than its predecessor.

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Semiconductor scientists discover effect that was thought impossible

A physical effect known as superinjection underlies modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. For decades this effect was believed to occur only in semiconductor heterostructures. Researchers now have found superinjection to be possible in homostructures, which are made of a single material.

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Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it’s slowing their evolution

If you’ve ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles — diminutive little tree lizards — spend much of their day shuttling in and out of shade. But, according to a new study, this behavioral ‘thermoregulation’ isn’t just affecting their body temperature. Surprisingly, it’s also slowing their evolution.

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Sand tiger sharks return to shipwrecks off N.C. coast

A study reveals shipwrecks off North Carolina’s coast are important habitats for sand tiger sharks, whose population plummeted in the 1980 and 1990s. Photos taken months and even years apart by scuba divers show female sand tiger sharks returning to the same shipwrecks. The photos were uploaded to the citizen-science program Spot A Shark USA which used specialized software to ID the sharks.

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Mixing grass varieties may reduce insect infestations in lawns

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for lawns of St. Augustinegrass could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research. While no single St. Augustinegrass cultivar rises above the rest in resisting infestation, mixing varieties may confer some benefits, as fall armyworms clearly preferred single-cultivar plantings in a series of lab tests.

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Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless

A team of scientists has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects.

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Insights on marijuana and opioid use in people with cancer

A new study reveals that many people with cancer use marijuana, and rates of use in the US have increased over time. The study also found that patients with cancer are more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer.

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DNA is managed like climbers’ rope to help keep tangles at bay

Scientists have uncovered a process in cells that prevents DNA from becoming tangled, which resembles a method used to control climbers’ ropes.

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