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First transcatheter implant for diastolic heart failure successful

A new device, proven safe and effective, has been developed to treat diastolic heart failure.

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Kevlar-based artificial cartilage mimics the magic of the real thing

The unparalleled liquid strength of cartilage, which is about 80 percent water, withstands some of the toughest forces on our bodies. Synthetic materials couldn’t match it — until “Kevlartilage” was developed.

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Aging tests yield varying results

A lot of people seem willing to spend hundreds to find out whether they’re aging faster or slower than their chronological age would suggest. Unfortunately, they’re just going to have to wait and see. A head-to-head comparison of 11 different measures of aging, including blood and chromosome tests like those being sold commercially, has found that they don’t agree with one another on how fast a given person is growing older.

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Potential cell receptors to reduce antibiotic resistance identified

The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The pathogen is resistant to many antibiotics so treating those infections, particularly in patients with compromised immune systems, is difficult. A new study has identified certain chemical receptors in cells that could deceive the bacteria and improve patient response to drugs.

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What is the computational power of the universe?

Can a close look at the universe give us solutions to problems too difficult for a computer — even if we built a computer larger than a planet? Physicist Stephen Jordan reflects on this question in a new NIST video, along with a scientific paper that considers one particular tough problem the universe might answer.

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Multiplayer video games: Skill at game and intelligence linked

A link between young people’s ability to perform well at two popular video games and high levels of intelligence has been uncovered.

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Study urges global-change researchers to embrace variability

A new review article presents evidence that argues for a more nuanced approach to the design of global-change experiments — one that acknowledges and purposefully incorporates the variability inherent in nature.

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Where a leaf lands and lies influences carbon levels in soil for years to come

Whether carbon comes from leaves or needles affects how fast it decomposes, but where it ends up determines how long it’s available.

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Why these Amish live longer and healthier: An internal ‘Fountain of Youth’

The first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans has been discovered in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana, report scientists. An experimental “longevity” drug that recreates the effect of the mutation is now being tested in human trials to see if it provides protection against some aging-related illnesses.

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Does this one gene fuel obesity?

Variants in a gene called ankyrin-B — carried by millions of Americans — could cause people to put on pounds through no fault of their own, new research demonstrates.

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