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Contact lenses provide extended pain relief to laser eye surgery patients

Scientists are reporting development of contact lenses that could provide a continuous supply of anesthetic medication to the eyes of patients who undergo laser eye surgery — an advance that could relieve patients of the burden of repeatedly placing drops of medicine into their eyes every few hours for several days.

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Butterflies and birds unable to keep pace with climate change in Europe

Butterflies and birds are no longer able to keep up with climate change. Compared with 20 years ago, butterflies are now 135 kilometers behind the shifting climate zones and birds more than 200 kilometers, according to findings of a new study.

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Lack of sleep makes your brain hungry

New research shows that a specific brain region that contributes to a person’s appetite sensation is more activated in response to food images after one night of sleep loss than after one night of normal sleep. Poor sleep habits can therefore affect people’s risk of becoming overweight in the long run.

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Ulcer-causing bacteria baffled by mucus: Researchers discover impact of viscoelasticity on collective behavior of swimming microorganisms

A new study demonstrates how introducing certain polymers—like those found in human mucus and saliva—into an aquatic environment makes it significantly more difficult for ulcer-causing bacteria and other microorganisms to coordinate.

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Extremely rare turtle is released into the wild

Biologists have successfully released a Southern River terrapin (Batagur affinis) – one of the most endangered turtles on Earth – into the Sre Ambel River in Cambodia.

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Continuing uncertainties surround anti-influenza drug

Incomplete availability of data has hampered a thorough assessment of the evidence for using the anti-influenza drug oseltamivir, a Cochrane Review has found. However, after piecing together information from over 16,000 pages of clinical trial data and documents used in the process of licensing oseltamivir (Tamiflu) by national authorities, a team of researchers has raised critical questions about how well the drug works and about its reported safety profile.

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Effects of Tamiflu still uncertain, warn experts, as Roche continues to withhold key trial data, according to new report

Two years after pharmaceutical giant Roche promised the British Medical Journal it would release key Tamiflu trial data for independent scrutiny, the safety and effectiveness of this anti-influenza drug remains uncertain, warn experts. A new report by the Cochrane Collaboration says Roche’s refusal to provide full access to all its data leaves critical questions about how well the drug works unresolved.

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Transparency limits on transparent conducting oxides identified

Computational materials researchers have used cutting-edge calculations to determine fundamental optical transparency limits in conducting oxide material tin oxide.

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Enhancing cognition in older adults also changes personality

A program designed to boost cognition in older adults also increased their openness to new experiences, researchers report, demonstrating for the first time that a non-drug intervention in older adults can change a personality trait once thought to be fixed throughout the lifespan.

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Unhappy at work? The boss or the company may be to blame

If our psychological needs at work are met, we are more likely to be happy. If you are unhappy at work, it could be partly due to your boss’ management style, according to a new study. Both over-controlling managers who use threats as a way to motivate employees, and organizations that do not appear to value individuals’ contributions, frustrate our basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness (how we relate to others). This, in turn, is likely to have a negative impact on our well-being at work.

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