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Raytheon BBN Technologies Awarded $2.2 Million to Investigate Methods to Advance Quantum Computing Research

Raytheon BBN Technologies has been awarded $2.2 million in funding under the Quantum Computer Science (QCS) program sponsored by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

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Researchers develop new method for analyzing cell function

Researchers in Finland and Germany have developed an open-source software that will make it significantly easier to process bioimaging data. The software, named BioImageXD, will help in analysing cell and tissue functions.

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Rewriting quantum chips with a beam of light

Laser technique developed by CCNY and Berkeley researchers brings ultrafast computing closer to reality.

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Nanotechnology scientists spark new interest in the century-old Edison battery

Stanford University scientists have breathed new life into the nickel-iron battery, a rechargeable technology developed by Thomas Edison more than a century ago.

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Magnet helps target transplanted iron-loaded cells to key areas of heart

Optimal stem cell therapy delivery to damaged areas of the heart after myocardial infarction has been hampered by inefficient homing of cells to the damaged site. However, using rat models, researchers in France have used a magnet to guide cells loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles to key sites, enhancing the myocardial retention of intravascularly delivered endothelial progenitor cells.

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All nanotechnology students invited to INASCON 2012

INASCON is an annual conference organised by students for students. It is aimed at students who have completed at least two years of study in a nanoscience or nanotechnology related university program.

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Capitol Hill briefing on nanomaterial safety and Toxic Substances Control Act

The American Chemical Society Science and the Congress Project is organizing a luncheon briefing on “Nanomaterial Safety: Do We Have the Right Tools?”

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Charging your cell phone with your T-shirt

The future of electronics will be flexible. Not only will you be able to roll up your iPads and smart phones like a piece of paper, electronic devices will be invisibly embedded in the textiles you wear from baby diapers to doctors’ surgical gloves. To realize such devices, equally flexible power sources need to be integrated with the electronic devices. Textile yarns are an obvious choice. Researchers are already pushing ahead with electronic textiles (e-textiles), for instance by coating regular cotton yarns with single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and polyelectrolytes, thus making cotton fibers conductive. Addressing the power source issue, researchers have now found a simple way to provide cotton with a new function – storing energy.

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Abakan’s PComP Nanocomposite Coatings Win 2012 R&D Award

Abakan announces that MesoCoat and Powdermet’s revolutionary, high performance PComP(TM) nanocomposite coatings, which are used to extend the life of mechanical components such as valves, pumps, hydraulic cylinders, bearings, actuators, motors and drive shafts, have been recognized as the most significant materials science innovation of 2012 by R&D magazine.

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Nano-sandwich technique slims down solar cells, improves efficiency

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way to create much slimmer thin-film solar cells without sacrificing the cells’ ability to absorb solar energy. Making the cells thinner should significantly decrease manufacturing costs for the technology.

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