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Samsung and eSilicon taped-out 14nm network processor with Rambus 28G SerDes solution

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.today announced a successful network processor tape-out based on Samsung’s 14LPP (Low-Power Plus) process technology in close collaboration with eSilicon and Rambus. This achievement is built on Samsung’s cutting-edge foundry process and design infra for network applications, eSilicon’s complex ASIC and 2.5D design capability with its IP solutions, and Rambus’ high-speed 28G SerDes solution.

Samsung’s 14LPP process technology based on 3D FinFET structure has already been proven for its high performance and manufacturability through mass production track record. The next generation process for network application is 10LPP process which is based on 10LPE (Low-Power Early) of which mass production was started from last year for the first time in the industry. 10LPP process’ mass production will be started in this year end.

Additionally, Samsung named its newly developed full 2.5D turnkey solution, which connects a logic chip and HBM2 memory with an interposer, as I-CubeTM (Interposer-Cube) solution. This 14LPP network process chip is the first product that Samsung applied I-CubeTM solution together with Samsung’s HBM2 memory. The I-CubeTM solution will be essential to network applications for high-speed signaling, and it is expected to be adopted into other applications such as computing, server and AI in the near future.

“This successful 14nm network processor tape-out was combined with eSilicon’s proven design ability in network area and Rambus’ expertise in SerDes and Samsung’s robust process technology along with I-Cube solution,” said Ryan Lee, Vice President of Foundry Marketing Team at Samsung Electronics. “Our collaboration model will have a great influence on a network foundry segment and Samsung will keep developing its network foundry solution to be a meaningful total network solution provider aligned with its process roadmap from 14nm and 10nm to 7nm.”

“This project was a true collaboration between Samsung, Rambus and eSilicon. eSilicon is proud to bring its FinFET ASIC and interposer design skills along with our substantial 2.5D integration skills to the project,” said Patrick Soheili, Vice President of Product Management and corporate development at eSilicon. “Our HBM Gen2 PHY, custom flip-chip package design and custom memory designs also helped to optimize the power, performance and area for the project.”

“Networking OEMs are looking for high-quality leadership IP suppliers that can bring 28G backplane SerDes in advanced FinFET process nodes to market,” said Luc Seraphin, senior vice president and general manager of Rambus Memory and Interfaces Division. “Our success with Samsung and eSilicon is a testament that these industry-leading solutions are attainable when you bring leading companies together. This is the first of several other offerings we plan to bring to networking and enterprise ASIC markets around the globe.”

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MicroLEDs for displays: How we can make it happen

Many large companies and startups are currently working on microLED technologies for display applications: from LED makers such as Epistar, Nichia or Osram to display makers like AUO, BOE or CSOT and OEMs such as Apple or Facebook/Oculus. Due to the multiplicity of players and the diversity of strategies, KnowMade, part of Yole Group of Companies underlines a complex and heavy patent landscape. “Enabling large scale microLED displays manufacturing requires to bring together 3 major disparate know-how and supply chain bricks including LED manufacturing, display manufacturing and technology transfer & assembly”, asserts Dr Eric Virey, Senior Technology & Market Analyst at Yole Développement (Yole), part of Yole Group of Companies. The microLED displays supply chain is therefore still under construction. Participants have to find the way to collaborate together and define the most efficient manufacturing approach.

display supply chain

While very promising in terms of performance, there are still multiple manufacturing challenges that need to be addressed to enable cost effective, high volume manufacturing of microLED displays. Based on its latest microLED display technology & market report , the “More than Moore” market research and strategy consulting company Yole proposes a live event titled Microled Displays: hype and reality | Hopes & challenges. Taking place on March 29 at 5:00 PM CET this webcast powered by I-micronews.com welcomes Dr Eric Virey from Yole. During this event, Dr Virey will expose the technical challenges and market opportunities of the microLED technologies. To register, click MicroLED Display.

“Even if the remaining technology roadblocks are removed, no company beside Apple and its startup Luxvue acquired in 2014 currently appear to have the positioning and leverage to enable the supply chain,” comments Yole’s expert. So what could happen?

If successful, microLED displays could have a profound impact on both the LED and display supply chains. Indeed, the development of large scale microLED displays requires the combination of three major disparate technologies: LED, TFT backplane and chip transfer. The supply chain is complex and lengthy compared with that of traditional displays. Each process is critical and managing every aspect effectively will be challenging. “No single player can solve all the issues and it seems unlikely that any will fully vertically integrate”, comments Dr Virey from Yole. And he details:

• Small companies could bring together the different technologies to serve the AR/MR market, but for high volume consumer applications such as mobiles or TVs, only a strong push from a leading OEM can enable a supply chain.
• Apple has a unique market positioning: and appears to be the most likely candidate with enough leverage and financial strength to bring all partners together.
• Other candidates including Oculus for example, have also invested in microLEDs for AR/MR applications.

So what will be the next step? Yole confirms: each company will attempt to capture as much added value as it can.

For LED makers, low defect requirements and high resolution features of microLED mean large investments in new clean room and lithography equipment which might be better suited to CMOS foundries.

Traditional display makers are used to manufacturing both back and front planes in an integrated fashion and delivering finished panels to OEMs. With microLEDs, they will push back against becoming component suppliers, only providing a TFT backplane to whichever participant will produce the final display assembly: OEMs or OSAT players.

In parallel, some companies will benefit from microLED displays independently of how the supply chain is shaped. These beneficiaries include MOCVD reactor and other LED equipment manufacturers as well as wafer suppliers.

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Imec scientist awarded ERC Advanced Grant to develop material stacks for video-rate holography

 Imec, the research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, announces that Jan Genoe, one of its distinguished scientists, has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant. With the grant of 2.5 million euros for a five-year period, Genoe’s team will develop and integrate the breakthrough technology needed to prove the possibility of high-quality video-rate holographic projection. ERC Advanced Grants are awarded by the European Research Council to allow outstanding scientists to pursue ground-breaking, high-risk projects.

Today, despite many efforts by researchers worldwide, there are no holographic projectors that allow video-rate electronically controlled projection of complex holograms. Optically rewriteable holograms exist, but they are too slow; acoustically-formed holograms can be switched fast but the image complexity is very limited. With a breakthrough combination of smart electronics, optics and materials, imec’s Jan Genoe aims to clear the roadblocks and enable next-generation video holography.

Jan Genoe: “At imec, we have most of the underlying technologies and expertise that are needed to advance holography. Advanced CMOS technologies enable to write huge hologram patterns at data rates beyond 10 Gbit/s, we can design a front end that can control charges and voltage patterns at sub-wavelength resolution. Moreover,  we can grow the necessary waveguides, couple laser light into them, and integrate transparent semiconducting oxides to bring charges close to a waveguide. This grant offers us the opportunity to merge all the necessary technology to make this giant leap in holography.”

The ERC Advanced Grants are earmarked for scientists who are leaders in their field of research with at least a decade of significant achievements. Imec’s CTO Jo De Boeck comments “Adding to the other ERC grants that our researchers already received, this one again proves that we are investing in long-term, high-quality research needed to solve this generation’s R&D challenges. This radical combination of innovation in architecture, materials and driving schemes will be the driver for many future innovations and applications in domains such as augmented reality, automotive, optical metrology, mobile communication, education, or safety, innovations with a high economic and social impact.”

Jan Genoe is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff of imec’s Large Area Electronics (LAE) department and part-time professor at KU Leuven (ESAT, Technology Campus Diepenbeek). He received an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. from KU Leuven in 1988 and 1994 respectively. Before joining imec, Jan Genoe worked at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Grenoble (France) as a Human Capital and Mobility Fellow of the European Community. His current research interests are with designing circuits with organic and oxide transistors, but also with organic photovoltaics and piezo-electric devices. Jan Genoe is the author and co-author of more than 150 papers in refereed journals. He is reviewer for a broad range of journals and is member of the Technology Directions international program committee of the ISSCC.

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Samsung and eSilicon taped-out 14nm network processor with Rambus 28G SerDes solution

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.today announced a successful network processor tape-out based on Samsung’s 14LPP (Low-Power Plus) process technology in close collaboration with eSilicon and Rambus. This achievement is built on Samsung’s cutting-edge foundry process and design infra for network applications, eSilicon’s complex ASIC and 2.5D design capability with its IP solutions, and Rambus’ high-speed 28G SerDes solution.

Samsung’s 14LPP process technology based on 3D FinFET structure has already been proven for its high performance and manufacturability through mass production track record. The next generation process for network application is 10LPP process which is based on 10LPE (Low-Power Early) of which mass production was started from last year for the first time in the industry. 10LPP process’ mass production will be started in this year end.

Additionally, Samsung named its newly developed full 2.5D turnkey solution, which connects a logic chip and HBM2 memory with an interposer, as I-CubeTM (Interposer-Cube) solution. This 14LPP network process chip is the first product that Samsung applied I-CubeTM solution together with Samsung’s HBM2 memory. The I-CubeTM solution will be essential to network applications for high-speed signaling, and it is expected to be adopted into other applications such as computing, server and AI in the near future.

“This successful 14nm network processor tape-out was combined with eSilicon’s proven design ability in network area and Rambus’ expertise in SerDes and Samsung’s robust process technology along with I-Cube solution,” said Ryan Lee, Vice President of Foundry Marketing Team at Samsung Electronics. “Our collaboration model will have a great influence on a network foundry segment and Samsung will keep developing its network foundry solution to be a meaningful total network solution provider aligned with its process roadmap from 14nm and 10nm to 7nm.”

“This project was a true collaboration between Samsung, Rambus and eSilicon. eSilicon is proud to bring its FinFET ASIC and interposer design skills along with our substantial 2.5D integration skills to the project,” said Patrick Soheili, Vice President of Product Management and corporate development at eSilicon. “Our HBM Gen2 PHY, custom flip-chip package design and custom memory designs also helped to optimize the power, performance and area for the project.”

“Networking OEMs are looking for high-quality leadership IP suppliers that can bring 28G backplane SerDes in advanced FinFET process nodes to market,” said Luc Seraphin, senior vice president and general manager of Rambus Memory and Interfaces Division. “Our success with Samsung and eSilicon is a testament that these industry-leading solutions are attainable when you bring leading companies together. This is the first of several other offerings we plan to bring to networking and enterprise ASIC markets around the globe.”

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MicroLEDs for displays: How we can make it happen

Many large companies and startups are currently working on microLED technologies for display applications: from LED makers such as Epistar, Nichia or Osram to display makers like AUO, BOE or CSOT and OEMs such as Apple or Facebook/Oculus. Due to the multiplicity of players and the diversity of strategies, KnowMade, part of Yole Group of Companies underlines a complex and heavy patent landscape. “Enabling large scale microLED displays manufacturing requires to bring together 3 major disparate know-how and supply chain bricks including LED manufacturing, display manufacturing and technology transfer & assembly”, asserts Dr Eric Virey, Senior Technology & Market Analyst at Yole Développement (Yole), part of Yole Group of Companies. The microLED displays supply chain is therefore still under construction. Participants have to find the way to collaborate together and define the most efficient manufacturing approach.

display supply chain

While very promising in terms of performance, there are still multiple manufacturing challenges that need to be addressed to enable cost effective, high volume manufacturing of microLED displays. Based on its latest microLED display technology & market report , the “More than Moore” market research and strategy consulting company Yole proposes a live event titled Microled Displays: hype and reality | Hopes & challenges. Taking place on March 29 at 5:00 PM CET this webcast powered by I-micronews.com welcomes Dr Eric Virey from Yole. During this event, Dr Virey will expose the technical challenges and market opportunities of the microLED technologies. To register, click MicroLED Display.

“Even if the remaining technology roadblocks are removed, no company beside Apple and its startup Luxvue acquired in 2014 currently appear to have the positioning and leverage to enable the supply chain,” comments Yole’s expert. So what could happen?

If successful, microLED displays could have a profound impact on both the LED and display supply chains. Indeed, the development of large scale microLED displays requires the combination of three major disparate technologies: LED, TFT backplane and chip transfer. The supply chain is complex and lengthy compared with that of traditional displays. Each process is critical and managing every aspect effectively will be challenging. “No single player can solve all the issues and it seems unlikely that any will fully vertically integrate”, comments Dr Virey from Yole. And he details:

• Small companies could bring together the different technologies to serve the AR/MR market, but for high volume consumer applications such as mobiles or TVs, only a strong push from a leading OEM can enable a supply chain.
• Apple has a unique market positioning: and appears to be the most likely candidate with enough leverage and financial strength to bring all partners together.
• Other candidates including Oculus for example, have also invested in microLEDs for AR/MR applications.

So what will be the next step? Yole confirms: each company will attempt to capture as much added value as it can.

For LED makers, low defect requirements and high resolution features of microLED mean large investments in new clean room and lithography equipment which might be better suited to CMOS foundries.

Traditional display makers are used to manufacturing both back and front planes in an integrated fashion and delivering finished panels to OEMs. With microLEDs, they will push back against becoming component suppliers, only providing a TFT backplane to whichever participant will produce the final display assembly: OEMs or OSAT players.

In parallel, some companies will benefit from microLED displays independently of how the supply chain is shaped. These beneficiaries include MOCVD reactor and other LED equipment manufacturers as well as wafer suppliers.

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Imec scientist awarded ERC Advanced Grant to develop material stacks for video-rate holography

 Imec, the research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, announces that Jan Genoe, one of its distinguished scientists, has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant. With the grant of 2.5 million euros for a five-year period, Genoe’s team will develop and integrate the breakthrough technology needed to prove the possibility of high-quality video-rate holographic projection. ERC Advanced Grants are awarded by the European Research Council to allow outstanding scientists to pursue ground-breaking, high-risk projects.

Today, despite many efforts by researchers worldwide, there are no holographic projectors that allow video-rate electronically controlled projection of complex holograms. Optically rewriteable holograms exist, but they are too slow; acoustically-formed holograms can be switched fast but the image complexity is very limited. With a breakthrough combination of smart electronics, optics and materials, imec’s Jan Genoe aims to clear the roadblocks and enable next-generation video holography.

Jan Genoe: “At imec, we have most of the underlying technologies and expertise that are needed to advance holography. Advanced CMOS technologies enable to write huge hologram patterns at data rates beyond 10 Gbit/s, we can design a front end that can control charges and voltage patterns at sub-wavelength resolution. Moreover,  we can grow the necessary waveguides, couple laser light into them, and integrate transparent semiconducting oxides to bring charges close to a waveguide. This grant offers us the opportunity to merge all the necessary technology to make this giant leap in holography.”

The ERC Advanced Grants are earmarked for scientists who are leaders in their field of research with at least a decade of significant achievements. Imec’s CTO Jo De Boeck comments “Adding to the other ERC grants that our researchers already received, this one again proves that we are investing in long-term, high-quality research needed to solve this generation’s R&D challenges. This radical combination of innovation in architecture, materials and driving schemes will be the driver for many future innovations and applications in domains such as augmented reality, automotive, optical metrology, mobile communication, education, or safety, innovations with a high economic and social impact.”

Jan Genoe is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff of imec’s Large Area Electronics (LAE) department and part-time professor at KU Leuven (ESAT, Technology Campus Diepenbeek). He received an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. from KU Leuven in 1988 and 1994 respectively. Before joining imec, Jan Genoe worked at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Grenoble (France) as a Human Capital and Mobility Fellow of the European Community. His current research interests are with designing circuits with organic and oxide transistors, but also with organic photovoltaics and piezo-electric devices. Jan Genoe is the author and co-author of more than 150 papers in refereed journals. He is reviewer for a broad range of journals and is member of the Technology Directions international program committee of the ISSCC.

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Samsung and eSilicon taped-out 14nm network processor with Rambus 28G SerDes solution

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.today announced a successful network processor tape-out based on Samsung’s 14LPP (Low-Power Plus) process technology in close collaboration with eSilicon and Rambus. This achievement is built on Samsung’s cutting-edge foundry process and design infra for network applications, eSilicon’s complex ASIC and 2.5D design capability with its IP solutions, and Rambus’ high-speed 28G SerDes solution.

Samsung’s 14LPP process technology based on 3D FinFET structure has already been proven for its high performance and manufacturability through mass production track record. The next generation process for network application is 10LPP process which is based on 10LPE (Low-Power Early) of which mass production was started from last year for the first time in the industry. 10LPP process’ mass production will be started in this year end.

Additionally, Samsung named its newly developed full 2.5D turnkey solution, which connects a logic chip and HBM2 memory with an interposer, as I-CubeTM (Interposer-Cube) solution. This 14LPP network process chip is the first product that Samsung applied I-CubeTM solution together with Samsung’s HBM2 memory. The I-CubeTM solution will be essential to network applications for high-speed signaling, and it is expected to be adopted into other applications such as computing, server and AI in the near future.

“This successful 14nm network processor tape-out was combined with eSilicon’s proven design ability in network area and Rambus’ expertise in SerDes and Samsung’s robust process technology along with I-Cube solution,” said Ryan Lee, Vice President of Foundry Marketing Team at Samsung Electronics. “Our collaboration model will have a great influence on a network foundry segment and Samsung will keep developing its network foundry solution to be a meaningful total network solution provider aligned with its process roadmap from 14nm and 10nm to 7nm.”

“This project was a true collaboration between Samsung, Rambus and eSilicon. eSilicon is proud to bring its FinFET ASIC and interposer design skills along with our substantial 2.5D integration skills to the project,” said Patrick Soheili, Vice President of Product Management and corporate development at eSilicon. “Our HBM Gen2 PHY, custom flip-chip package design and custom memory designs also helped to optimize the power, performance and area for the project.”

“Networking OEMs are looking for high-quality leadership IP suppliers that can bring 28G backplane SerDes in advanced FinFET process nodes to market,” said Luc Seraphin, senior vice president and general manager of Rambus Memory and Interfaces Division. “Our success with Samsung and eSilicon is a testament that these industry-leading solutions are attainable when you bring leading companies together. This is the first of several other offerings we plan to bring to networking and enterprise ASIC markets around the globe.”

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MicroLEDs for displays: How we can make it happen

Many large companies and startups are currently working on microLED technologies for display applications: from LED makers such as Epistar, Nichia or Osram to display makers like AUO, BOE or CSOT and OEMs such as Apple or Facebook/Oculus. Due to the multiplicity of players and the diversity of strategies, KnowMade, part of Yole Group of Companies underlines a complex and heavy patent landscape. “Enabling large scale microLED displays manufacturing requires to bring together 3 major disparate know-how and supply chain bricks including LED manufacturing, display manufacturing and technology transfer & assembly”, asserts Dr Eric Virey, Senior Technology & Market Analyst at Yole Développement (Yole), part of Yole Group of Companies. The microLED displays supply chain is therefore still under construction. Participants have to find the way to collaborate together and define the most efficient manufacturing approach.

display supply chain

While very promising in terms of performance, there are still multiple manufacturing challenges that need to be addressed to enable cost effective, high volume manufacturing of microLED displays. Based on its latest microLED display technology & market report , the “More than Moore” market research and strategy consulting company Yole proposes a live event titled Microled Displays: hype and reality | Hopes & challenges. Taking place on March 29 at 5:00 PM CET this webcast powered by I-micronews.com welcomes Dr Eric Virey from Yole. During this event, Dr Virey will expose the technical challenges and market opportunities of the microLED technologies. To register, click MicroLED Display.

“Even if the remaining technology roadblocks are removed, no company beside Apple and its startup Luxvue acquired in 2014 currently appear to have the positioning and leverage to enable the supply chain,” comments Yole’s expert. So what could happen?

If successful, microLED displays could have a profound impact on both the LED and display supply chains. Indeed, the development of large scale microLED displays requires the combination of three major disparate technologies: LED, TFT backplane and chip transfer. The supply chain is complex and lengthy compared with that of traditional displays. Each process is critical and managing every aspect effectively will be challenging. “No single player can solve all the issues and it seems unlikely that any will fully vertically integrate”, comments Dr Virey from Yole. And he details:

• Small companies could bring together the different technologies to serve the AR/MR market, but for high volume consumer applications such as mobiles or TVs, only a strong push from a leading OEM can enable a supply chain.
• Apple has a unique market positioning: and appears to be the most likely candidate with enough leverage and financial strength to bring all partners together.
• Other candidates including Oculus for example, have also invested in microLEDs for AR/MR applications.

So what will be the next step? Yole confirms: each company will attempt to capture as much added value as it can.

For LED makers, low defect requirements and high resolution features of microLED mean large investments in new clean room and lithography equipment which might be better suited to CMOS foundries.

Traditional display makers are used to manufacturing both back and front planes in an integrated fashion and delivering finished panels to OEMs. With microLEDs, they will push back against becoming component suppliers, only providing a TFT backplane to whichever participant will produce the final display assembly: OEMs or OSAT players.

In parallel, some companies will benefit from microLED displays independently of how the supply chain is shaped. These beneficiaries include MOCVD reactor and other LED equipment manufacturers as well as wafer suppliers.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Imec scientist awarded ERC Advanced Grant to develop material stacks for video-rate holography

 Imec, the research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, announces that Jan Genoe, one of its distinguished scientists, has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant. With the grant of 2.5 million euros for a five-year period, Genoe’s team will develop and integrate the breakthrough technology needed to prove the possibility of high-quality video-rate holographic projection. ERC Advanced Grants are awarded by the European Research Council to allow outstanding scientists to pursue ground-breaking, high-risk projects.

Today, despite many efforts by researchers worldwide, there are no holographic projectors that allow video-rate electronically controlled projection of complex holograms. Optically rewriteable holograms exist, but they are too slow; acoustically-formed holograms can be switched fast but the image complexity is very limited. With a breakthrough combination of smart electronics, optics and materials, imec’s Jan Genoe aims to clear the roadblocks and enable next-generation video holography.

Jan Genoe: “At imec, we have most of the underlying technologies and expertise that are needed to advance holography. Advanced CMOS technologies enable to write huge hologram patterns at data rates beyond 10 Gbit/s, we can design a front end that can control charges and voltage patterns at sub-wavelength resolution. Moreover,  we can grow the necessary waveguides, couple laser light into them, and integrate transparent semiconducting oxides to bring charges close to a waveguide. This grant offers us the opportunity to merge all the necessary technology to make this giant leap in holography.”

The ERC Advanced Grants are earmarked for scientists who are leaders in their field of research with at least a decade of significant achievements. Imec’s CTO Jo De Boeck comments “Adding to the other ERC grants that our researchers already received, this one again proves that we are investing in long-term, high-quality research needed to solve this generation’s R&D challenges. This radical combination of innovation in architecture, materials and driving schemes will be the driver for many future innovations and applications in domains such as augmented reality, automotive, optical metrology, mobile communication, education, or safety, innovations with a high economic and social impact.”

Jan Genoe is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff of imec’s Large Area Electronics (LAE) department and part-time professor at KU Leuven (ESAT, Technology Campus Diepenbeek). He received an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. from KU Leuven in 1988 and 1994 respectively. Before joining imec, Jan Genoe worked at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Grenoble (France) as a Human Capital and Mobility Fellow of the European Community. His current research interests are with designing circuits with organic and oxide transistors, but also with organic photovoltaics and piezo-electric devices. Jan Genoe is the author and co-author of more than 150 papers in refereed journals. He is reviewer for a broad range of journals and is member of the Technology Directions international program committee of the ISSCC.

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Plugging leaks in printable logic

Self-assembling thin films make it possible to produce flexible electronic devices using a single plastic transistor.

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