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IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics

An international team of physicists, materials scientists and string theoreticians have observed a phenomenon on Earth that was previously thought to only occur hundreds of light years away or at the time when the universe was born. This result could lead to a more evidence-based model for the understanding the universe and for improving the energy-conversion process in electronic devices.

Using a recently discovered material called a Weyl semimetal, similar to 3D graphene, scientists at IBM Research (NYSE: IBM) have mimicked a gravitational field in their test sample by imposing a temperature gradient. The study was supervised by Prof. Kornelius Nielsch, Director at the Leibniz Institute for Materials and Solid State Research Dresden (IFW) and Prof. Claudia Felser, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden.

After conducting the experiment in a cryolab at the University of Hamburg with high magnetic fields, a team of theoreticians from TU Dresden, UC Berkeley and the Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC confirmed with detailed calculations that they observed a quantum effect known as an axial-gravitational anomaly, which breaks one of the classical conservation laws, such as charge, energy and momentum.

This law-breaking anomaly had previously been derived in purely theoretical reasoning with methods based on string theory. It was believed to exist only at extremely high temperatures of trillions of degrees, as an exotic form of matter, called a quark-gluon plasma, at the early stages of the universe deep within the cosmos or created using particle colliders. But to their surprise, the researchers discovered that it also exists on Earth in the properties of solid-state physics, on which much of the computing industry is based on, spanning from tiny transistors to cloud data centers. This discovery is appearing today in the peer-reviewed journal Nature.

“For the first time, we have experimentally observed this fundamental quantum anomaly on Earth which is extremely important towards our understanding of the universe,” said Dr. Johannes Gooth, an IBM Research scientist and lead author of the paper. “We can now build novel solid-state devices based on this anomaly that have never been considered before to potentially circumvent some of the problems inherent in classical electronic devices, such as transistors.”

“This is an incredibly exciting discovery. We can clearly conclude that the same breaking of symmetry can be observed in any physical system, whether it occurred at the beginning of the universe or is happening today, right here on Earth,” said Prof. Dr. Karl Landsteiner, a string theorist at the Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC and co-author of the paper.

IBM scientists predict this discovery will open up a rush of new developments around sensors, switches and thermoelectric coolers or energy-harvesting devices, for improved power consumption.

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2017 IEEE IEDM to showcase technology and device breakthroughs in logic, memory, bioelectronics, silicon photonics

Advances in semiconductor and related devices are driving significant progress in our increasingly digital world, and the place to learn about cutting-edge research in the field is the annual IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), to be held December 2-6, 2017 at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square hotel. Highlights for 2017 include:

  • A talk on transformative electronics by Dr. Hiroshi Amano, who received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics along with Isamu Akasaki and Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue LEDs, which sparked a revolution in innovative, energy-saving lighting.
  • The above talk is part of an exceptional slate of plenary talks to be given by some of the industry’s leading figures. IEDM plenary presenters include the CEO of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.; the research chief of TSMC, which is the industry’s largest foundry driving technology forward; a leading academic authority on energy-efficient computing, which is a key societal goal; as well as Dr. Amano’s fourth, additional plenary talk. It will be given on Wednesday, Dec. 6.
  • Focus Sessions will be held on the following topics: 3D Integration and Packaging; Modeling Challenges for Neuromorphic Computing; Nanosensors for Disease Diagnostics; and Silicon Photonics: Current status and perspectives.
  • A vendor exhibition will be held again, based on the success of last year’s first-ever such event at the IEDM.
  • The IEEE Magnetics Society will host a poster session on MRAM (magnetic RAM memories).

The IEDM paper submission deadline this year is August 2 and the deadline for late-news papers is September 11. Only a limited number of late-news papers will be accepted.

Each year at the IEDM, the world’s best technologists in micro/nano/bioelectronics converge to participate in a technical program consisting of more than 220 presentations along with special luncheon talks and a variety of panels, special sessions, tutorials, Short Courses, IEEE/EDS award presentations and other events that highlight leading work in more diverse areas of the field than any other conference.

“This year’s IEDM will feature talks, courses and panels by world experts on what is perhaps the broadest array of topics in recent memory,” said Dr. Barbara De Salvo, Scientific Director at Leti. “The unique technical program can lead one to view the IEDM as a crystal ball of sorts, because many of the developments reported at the conference invariably make their way into commercial products a few years down the road. As an example, this year’s IEDM conference marks 10 years since the industry transition from aluminum to copper interconnect began in earnest.”

Here are details of some of the events that will take place at this year’s IEDM:

Focus Sessions

  • 3D Integration and Packaging – Packaging technology is taking on an increasingly important role in semiconductor manufacturing, and this session will provide an industry perspective on forthcoming approaches ranging from “Simpler is better” to “Advanced packaging saves the day for continued scaling.” The session will address the latest in 3D, from alternative packaging to 3D stacking, and applications and technologies for Integrated Power Microelectronics.
  • Modeling Challenges for Neuromorphic Computing – This session will address the opportunities and challenges of efficient synaptic processes, from learning models to device-circuit implementations of neuromorphic architectures.  Half of the session will discuss learning models in stochastic processes, with the other half devoted to RRAM (resistive RAM) memory for deep neural networks and neuromorphic computing.
  • Nanosensors for Disease Diagnostics — From microfluidics to nanosensing, this session will review the latest advances for the detection of diseases such as cancer, sepsis and diabetes, using biomarkers ranging from (bio)molecules and individual cells to in-vitro tissue models.
  • Silicon Photonics: Current Status and Perspectives – This session addresses the state-of-the-art in silicon photonics technology, ranging from topics on high-volume manufacturing, optical transceivers and interconnects, to femto-joule per bit integrated nanophotonics for upcoming market applications in optical computing.

90-Minute Tutorials – Saturday, Dec. 2
A program of 90-minute tutorial sessions on emerging technologies will be presented by experts in the fields, bridging the gap between textbook-level knowledge and leading-edge current research. Advance registration is recommended.

  • The Evolution of Logic Transistors Toward Low Power and High Performance IoT Applications, Dr. Dae Won Ha, Samsung Electronics
  • Negative Capacitance Transistors, Prof. Sayeef Salahuddin, UC Berkeley
  • Fundamental, Thermal, and Energy Limits of PCM and ReRAM, Prof. Eric Pop, Stanford University
  • Hardware Opportunities in Cognitive Computing: Near- and Far-Term, Dr. Geoffrey Burr, Principal Research Staff Member, IBM Research-Almaden
  • 2.5D Interposers and High-Density Fanout Packaging as Enablers for Future Systems Integration, Dr. Sundaram Venkatesh, Associate Director, Georgia Tech 3D Systems Packaging Research Center
  • Silicon Photonics for Next-Generation Optical Interconnects, Dr. Joris Van Campenhout, Program Director Optical I/O, IMEC

Short Courses – Sunday, Dec. 3
Short Courses provide the opportunity to learn about important areas and developments, and provide the opportunity to network with experts from around the world. Advance registration is recommended.

  • Performance Boosters and Variation Management in Sub-5nm CMOS, organized by Sandy Liao, Intel
  • Merged Memory-Logic Technologies and Their Applications, organized by Kevin Zhang, TSMC

Plenary Presentations – Monday, Dec. 4

  • System Scaling Innovation for Intelligent Ubiquitous Computing, Jack Sun, VP of R&D, TSMC
  • Driving the Future of High-Performance Computing, Lisa Su, President & CEO, AMD
  • Energy-Efficient Computing and Sensing: From Silicon to the Cloud, Adrian Ionescu, Professor, EPFL

Plenary Presentation – Wednesday, Dec. 6

  • Development of a Sustainable Smart Society by Transformative Electronics, Hiroshi Amano, Professor, Nagoya University

Evening Panel Session – Tuesday evening, Dec. 5
The IEDM offers attendees an evening session where panels of experts give their views on important industry topics. Audience participation is encouraged to foster an open and vigorous exchange of ideas.

  • Who Will Lead the Industry in the Future? Moderator: Prof. Philip Wong, Stanford University

Entrepreneurs Lunch
The topic and speaker are yet to be determined, but this popular luncheon jointly sponsored by IEDM and the IEEE Electron Devices Society will be held once again.

Further information about IEDM
For registration and other information, visit www.ieee-iedm.org.

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SUNY Poly awarded $720,000 by U.S. Department of Energy for next-generation semiconductor research

SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) announced today that Interim Dean of Graduate Studies Dr. Fatemeh (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik and her team of collaborators have been selected to receive $720,000 in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The grant will be used to develop more efficient and powerful high-performance power switches at SUNY Poly for power electronics applications, such as for enabling a more efficient energy grid, for example. The research is in partnership with Dr. Woongje Sung of SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc.

“On behalf of SUNY Poly, I am excited to congratulate Professor Shahedipour-Sandvik as her wide-bandgap-focused research is recognized by the Department of Energy for its potential to improve power devices that are all around us to make our technological world more energy efficient and robust,” said SUNY Poly Interim President Dr. Bahgat Sammakia. “This award highlights SUNY Poly’s unique and advanced research capabilities, as well as its superb faculty who are developing the innovations of tomorrow right now in New York State.”

“This award is a strong indicator of how SUNY Poly’s resources and facilities are enabling the types of research that have the potential to improve power electronics devices which have become ubiquitous, from those utilized to make the power grid more efficient, to those that can improve electric car capabilities,” said SUNY Poly Vice President of Research Dr. Michael Liehr.

“I am proud that the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARPA-E has recognized our leading-edge power electronics-focused research, which holds the incredible potential to drive innovation for practical applications that could lead to worldwide energy savings. Advanced power electronic devices offer significant advances in power density, efficiency, and reduced total lifecycle cost,” said Prof. Shahedipour-Sandvik. “This grant allowing our SUNY Poly team and partners at the Army Research Lab, Drexel University and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. to explore advanced doping and annealing techniques for gallium nitride-based power devices is a testament to how SUNY Poly’s resources and leadership in areas like power electronics can help power the future in exciting and meaningful ways.” 

The SUNY Poly grant is part of a total of $6.9 million in funding that the U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E is providing through its Power Nitride Doping Innovation Offers Devices Enabling SWITCHES (PNDIODES) program to seven institutions and organizations. With PNDIODES, ARPA-E is tackling a specific challenge in wide-bandgap semiconductor production. Wide-bandgap semiconductors are an important area of research because the materials, such as gallium nitride (GaN), allow for electronic devices to operate at higher temperatures and/or frequencies, for example, than current silicon-based computer chips, which is why technical advances in power electronics promise energy efficiency gains throughout the United States economy. Achieving high power conversion efficiency in these systems, however, requires low-loss power semiconductor switches. Power converters based on GaN could potentially meet the challenge by enabling higher voltage devices with improved efficiency—while also dramatically reducing size and weight of the device, for example.

The PNDIODES-funded research focuses on a process called selective area doping, in which a specific impurity is added to a semiconductor to change its electrical properties and achieve performance characteristics that are useful for electronics. Implemented well, this process can allow for the fabrication of devices at a competitive cost compared to their traditional, silicon-based counterparts. Developing a reliable and usable doping process that can be applied to specific regions of GaN and its alloys is an important obstacle in the fabrication of GaN-based power electronics devices that PNDIODES seeks to overcome. Ultimately, the PNDIODES project teams, including the Shahedipour-Sandvik team and Dr. Sung at SUNY Poly as well as the institution’s partners, will develop new ways to build semiconductors for high performance, high-powered applications like aerospace, electric vehicles, and the grid.

Prof. Shahedipour-Sandkvik team’s research, “Demonstration of PN-junctions by ion implantation techniques for GaN (DOPING-GaN),” will focus on ion implantation as the centerpiece of its approach and use new annealing techniques to develop processes to activate implanted silicon or magnesium in GaN to build p-n junctions, which are used to control the flow of electrons within an integrated circuit. Utilizing a unique technique with a gyrotron beam, a high-power vacuum tube that generates millimeter-wave electromagnetic waves, the team’s research aims to understand the impact of implantation on the microstructural properties of the GaN material and its effects on p-n diode performance.

In addition to this GaN-focused research being conducted by Prof. Shahedipour and her team at SUNY Poly, which also provides hands-on research opportunities for a number of the institution’s students, SUNY Poly and General Electric also lead the New York Power Electronics Manufacturing Consortium (NY-PEMC) with the goal of developing and producing low cost, high performance 6″ silicon carbide (SiC) wafers for power electronics applications. The consortium announced its first successful production of SiC-based patterned wafers in February at the Albany NanoTech Complex’s 150mm SiC line, with production coordinated with SUNY Poly’s Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C), located at its Utica campus where the SiC-based power chips will be packaged, a process that combines them with a housing that allows for interconnection with an application.

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AMOLED panel market to surge 63% in 2017

The global active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) panel market is forecast to surge 63 percent in 2017 from a year ago to $25.2 billion on growing demand for AMOLED panels in the smartphone and TV industries, according to IHS Markit (Nasdaq: INFO).

“Growing use of AMOLED panels in smartphones and rising sales of AMOLED TVs will mainly drive the growth of the AMOLED panel market,” said Ricky Park, director of display research at IHS Markit. “A steady rise in demand from head-mount displays and mobile PCs would also prop up the market.”

AMOLED_shipment_revenue_forecast_2

The demand for AMOLED displays has rapidly risen in the smartphone market in particular as the flexible substrate allows phones to be produced in various designs with a lighter and slimmer bodies. This year, leading smartphone makers have competitively rolled out premium phones that boast a very narrow bezel or nearly bezel-less designs.

“The AMOLED display market is also expected to get a boost from Apple’s decision to use an AMOLED screen in its iPhone series to be released later this year, and Chinese smartphone makers’ moving to newer applications of AMOLED panels,” Park said. “To meet the burgeoning demand, South Korean and Chinese display makers have been heavily investing in Generation 6 AMOLED fabs.”

According to Display Long-term Demand Forecast Tracker from IHS Markit, the TV industry, the second biggest market for AMOLED panels, will also play a major role in fostering the growth of the AMOLED panel market this year. LG Display, which currently dominates the AMOLED TV panel market, is set to embark on the operation of its second AMOLED TV panel line E4-2 with an aim to mass produce panels in the latter half of this year.

Bumped up by an increase in output, the AMOLED TV panel market is forecast to grow from 890,000 units last year to 1.5 million units this year. By 2021, the AMOLED panel market is projected to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 22 percent to exceed $40 billion.

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AMOLED fine metal mask market expected to reach $1.2B by 2022

As active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays quickly displace liquid crystal displays (LCDs) in smartphones, panel makers are rapidly adding new production capacity, accelerating the demand for the fine metal mask (FMM), a critical production component used to manufacture red-green-blue (RGB) AMOLEDs. The FMM market is forecast to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 38 percent from $234 million in 2017 to $1.2 billion in 2022, according to IHS Markit (Nasdaq: INFO).

 

AMOLED_FMM_revenue_forecast

In the AMOLED manufacturing process, FMM is a production component used to pattern individual red, green and blue subpixels. A heating source evaporates organic light-emitting materials, but vapor deposition can only be controlled precisely with the use of a physical mask. FMM — a metal sheet, only tens of microns thick, with millions of very small holes per panel — is the only production-proven method of accurately depositing RGB color components in high-resolution displays.

“FMM has become a bottleneck in the supply of AMOLED panels due to the manufacturing technology challenges posed by increasing resolutions and a limited supply base. As pixels per inch (PPI) increase, thinner FMMs with finer dimensions are required, which reduce mask production yield and useable lifetime,” said Jerry Kang, senior principal analyst of display research at IHS Markit.

Dai Nippon Printing (DNP) is the dominant FMM supplier, owing to its proprietary etching technology for very thin metal foils and mass production experience. Currently, DNP’s FMMs are used to fabricate the vast majority of AMOLED smartphone panels, and exclusively for high-end quad high definition (QHD) resolutions. “Most panel makers are now trying to procure DNP’s FMM in hopes of being able to quickly ramp new fabs to high yields,” Kang said.

The critical nature of FMM and rapid demand growth are encouraging a number of companies to develop alternative FMM technologies and enter the market. Panel makers are also encouraging new players as a second source to mitigate supply chain risk and create price competition. As the supply of FMM is a determinant factor in the AMOLED display market to meet its projected growth rates, and with the FMM market forecast to grow five times its current size by 2022, FMM is garnering intense interest from both set and panel makers alike and creating new opportunities for suppliers.

The AMOLED Shadow Mask Technology & Market – 2017 report from IHS Markit provides a comprehensive analysis of the latest technology and market trends for FMMs and open masks, as well as mask and panel supplier status updates, including forecasts of revenues, units, area and prices from 2014 to 2022.

 

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Brian Crutcher joins TI board of directors

Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) (NASDAQ: TXN) today announced that Brian T. Crutcher has been named to its board of directors. Mr. Crutcher is executive vice president and chief operating officer of TI.

“Brian is a great addition to our board,” said Rich Templeton, TI’s chairman, president and CEO. “He knows TI well and brings strong financial acumen and business judgment to the board.”

Crutcher, 44, joined TI in 1996 and has critical leadership responsibility for TI’s businesses, sales and manufacturing organizations. He was named a senior vice president in 2010, executive vice president in 2014 and chief operating officer in early 2017. Brian holds a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Central Florida and a Master of Business Administration from the University of California, Irvine.

“Brian’s 20-plus years of leading large, complex semiconductor operations gives him keen insights into the current and future state of this industry. His knowledge of markets and customers will be valuable to the board’s deliberations,” said Wayne Sanders, the TI board’s lead director and chairman of its governance and stockholder relations committee.

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IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics

An international team of physicists, materials scientists and string theoreticians have observed a phenomenon on Earth that was previously thought to only occur hundreds of light years away or at the time when the universe was born. This result could lead to a more evidence-based model for the understanding the universe and for improving the energy-conversion process in electronic devices.

Using a recently discovered material called a Weyl semimetal, similar to 3D graphene, scientists at IBM Research (NYSE: IBM) have mimicked a gravitational field in their test sample by imposing a temperature gradient. The study was supervised by Prof. Kornelius Nielsch, Director at the Leibniz Institute for Materials and Solid State Research Dresden (IFW) and Prof. Claudia Felser, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden.

After conducting the experiment in a cryolab at the University of Hamburg with high magnetic fields, a team of theoreticians from TU Dresden, UC Berkeley and the Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC confirmed with detailed calculations that they observed a quantum effect known as an axial-gravitational anomaly, which breaks one of the classical conservation laws, such as charge, energy and momentum.

This law-breaking anomaly had previously been derived in purely theoretical reasoning with methods based on string theory. It was believed to exist only at extremely high temperatures of trillions of degrees, as an exotic form of matter, called a quark-gluon plasma, at the early stages of the universe deep within the cosmos or created using particle colliders. But to their surprise, the researchers discovered that it also exists on Earth in the properties of solid-state physics, on which much of the computing industry is based on, spanning from tiny transistors to cloud data centers. This discovery is appearing today in the peer-reviewed journal Nature.

“For the first time, we have experimentally observed this fundamental quantum anomaly on Earth which is extremely important towards our understanding of the universe,” said Dr. Johannes Gooth, an IBM Research scientist and lead author of the paper. “We can now build novel solid-state devices based on this anomaly that have never been considered before to potentially circumvent some of the problems inherent in classical electronic devices, such as transistors.”

“This is an incredibly exciting discovery. We can clearly conclude that the same breaking of symmetry can be observed in any physical system, whether it occurred at the beginning of the universe or is happening today, right here on Earth,” said Prof. Dr. Karl Landsteiner, a string theorist at the Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC and co-author of the paper.

IBM scientists predict this discovery will open up a rush of new developments around sensors, switches and thermoelectric coolers or energy-harvesting devices, for improved power consumption.

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2017 IEEE IEDM to showcase technology and device breakthroughs in logic, memory, bioelectronics, silicon photonics

Advances in semiconductor and related devices are driving significant progress in our increasingly digital world, and the place to learn about cutting-edge research in the field is the annual IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), to be held December 2-6, 2017 at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square hotel. Highlights for 2017 include:

  • A talk on transformative electronics by Dr. Hiroshi Amano, who received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics along with Isamu Akasaki and Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue LEDs, which sparked a revolution in innovative, energy-saving lighting.
  • The above talk is part of an exceptional slate of plenary talks to be given by some of the industry’s leading figures. IEDM plenary presenters include the CEO of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.; the research chief of TSMC, which is the industry’s largest foundry driving technology forward; a leading academic authority on energy-efficient computing, which is a key societal goal; as well as Dr. Amano’s fourth, additional plenary talk. It will be given on Wednesday, Dec. 6.
  • Focus Sessions will be held on the following topics: 3D Integration and Packaging; Modeling Challenges for Neuromorphic Computing; Nanosensors for Disease Diagnostics; and Silicon Photonics: Current status and perspectives.
  • A vendor exhibition will be held again, based on the success of last year’s first-ever such event at the IEDM.
  • The IEEE Magnetics Society will host a poster session on MRAM (magnetic RAM memories).

The IEDM paper submission deadline this year is August 2 and the deadline for late-news papers is September 11. Only a limited number of late-news papers will be accepted.

Each year at the IEDM, the world’s best technologists in micro/nano/bioelectronics converge to participate in a technical program consisting of more than 220 presentations along with special luncheon talks and a variety of panels, special sessions, tutorials, Short Courses, IEEE/EDS award presentations and other events that highlight leading work in more diverse areas of the field than any other conference.

“This year’s IEDM will feature talks, courses and panels by world experts on what is perhaps the broadest array of topics in recent memory,” said Dr. Barbara De Salvo, Scientific Director at Leti. “The unique technical program can lead one to view the IEDM as a crystal ball of sorts, because many of the developments reported at the conference invariably make their way into commercial products a few years down the road. As an example, this year’s IEDM conference marks 10 years since the industry transition from aluminum to copper interconnect began in earnest.”

Here are details of some of the events that will take place at this year’s IEDM:

Focus Sessions

  • 3D Integration and Packaging – Packaging technology is taking on an increasingly important role in semiconductor manufacturing, and this session will provide an industry perspective on forthcoming approaches ranging from “Simpler is better” to “Advanced packaging saves the day for continued scaling.” The session will address the latest in 3D, from alternative packaging to 3D stacking, and applications and technologies for Integrated Power Microelectronics.
  • Modeling Challenges for Neuromorphic Computing – This session will address the opportunities and challenges of efficient synaptic processes, from learning models to device-circuit implementations of neuromorphic architectures.  Half of the session will discuss learning models in stochastic processes, with the other half devoted to RRAM (resistive RAM) memory for deep neural networks and neuromorphic computing.
  • Nanosensors for Disease Diagnostics — From microfluidics to nanosensing, this session will review the latest advances for the detection of diseases such as cancer, sepsis and diabetes, using biomarkers ranging from (bio)molecules and individual cells to in-vitro tissue models.
  • Silicon Photonics: Current Status and Perspectives – This session addresses the state-of-the-art in silicon photonics technology, ranging from topics on high-volume manufacturing, optical transceivers and interconnects, to femto-joule per bit integrated nanophotonics for upcoming market applications in optical computing.

90-Minute Tutorials – Saturday, Dec. 2
A program of 90-minute tutorial sessions on emerging technologies will be presented by experts in the fields, bridging the gap between textbook-level knowledge and leading-edge current research. Advance registration is recommended.

  • The Evolution of Logic Transistors Toward Low Power and High Performance IoT Applications, Dr. Dae Won Ha, Samsung Electronics
  • Negative Capacitance Transistors, Prof. Sayeef Salahuddin, UC Berkeley
  • Fundamental, Thermal, and Energy Limits of PCM and ReRAM, Prof. Eric Pop, Stanford University
  • Hardware Opportunities in Cognitive Computing: Near- and Far-Term, Dr. Geoffrey Burr, Principal Research Staff Member, IBM Research-Almaden
  • 2.5D Interposers and High-Density Fanout Packaging as Enablers for Future Systems Integration, Dr. Sundaram Venkatesh, Associate Director, Georgia Tech 3D Systems Packaging Research Center
  • Silicon Photonics for Next-Generation Optical Interconnects, Dr. Joris Van Campenhout, Program Director Optical I/O, IMEC

Short Courses – Sunday, Dec. 3
Short Courses provide the opportunity to learn about important areas and developments, and provide the opportunity to network with experts from around the world. Advance registration is recommended.

  • Performance Boosters and Variation Management in Sub-5nm CMOS, organized by Sandy Liao, Intel
  • Merged Memory-Logic Technologies and Their Applications, organized by Kevin Zhang, TSMC

Plenary Presentations – Monday, Dec. 4

  • System Scaling Innovation for Intelligent Ubiquitous Computing, Jack Sun, VP of R&D, TSMC
  • Driving the Future of High-Performance Computing, Lisa Su, President & CEO, AMD
  • Energy-Efficient Computing and Sensing: From Silicon to the Cloud, Adrian Ionescu, Professor, EPFL

Plenary Presentation – Wednesday, Dec. 6

  • Development of a Sustainable Smart Society by Transformative Electronics, Hiroshi Amano, Professor, Nagoya University

Evening Panel Session – Tuesday evening, Dec. 5
The IEDM offers attendees an evening session where panels of experts give their views on important industry topics. Audience participation is encouraged to foster an open and vigorous exchange of ideas.

  • Who Will Lead the Industry in the Future? Moderator: Prof. Philip Wong, Stanford University

Entrepreneurs Lunch
The topic and speaker are yet to be determined, but this popular luncheon jointly sponsored by IEDM and the IEEE Electron Devices Society will be held once again.

Further information about IEDM
For registration and other information, visit www.ieee-iedm.org.

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SUNY Poly awarded $720,000 by U.S. Department of Energy for next-generation semiconductor research

SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) announced today that Interim Dean of Graduate Studies Dr. Fatemeh (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik and her team of collaborators have been selected to receive $720,000 in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The grant will be used to develop more efficient and powerful high-performance power switches at SUNY Poly for power electronics applications, such as for enabling a more efficient energy grid, for example. The research is in partnership with Dr. Woongje Sung of SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc.

“On behalf of SUNY Poly, I am excited to congratulate Professor Shahedipour-Sandvik as her wide-bandgap-focused research is recognized by the Department of Energy for its potential to improve power devices that are all around us to make our technological world more energy efficient and robust,” said SUNY Poly Interim President Dr. Bahgat Sammakia. “This award highlights SUNY Poly’s unique and advanced research capabilities, as well as its superb faculty who are developing the innovations of tomorrow right now in New York State.”

“This award is a strong indicator of how SUNY Poly’s resources and facilities are enabling the types of research that have the potential to improve power electronics devices which have become ubiquitous, from those utilized to make the power grid more efficient, to those that can improve electric car capabilities,” said SUNY Poly Vice President of Research Dr. Michael Liehr.

“I am proud that the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARPA-E has recognized our leading-edge power electronics-focused research, which holds the incredible potential to drive innovation for practical applications that could lead to worldwide energy savings. Advanced power electronic devices offer significant advances in power density, efficiency, and reduced total lifecycle cost,” said Prof. Shahedipour-Sandvik. “This grant allowing our SUNY Poly team and partners at the Army Research Lab, Drexel University and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. to explore advanced doping and annealing techniques for gallium nitride-based power devices is a testament to how SUNY Poly’s resources and leadership in areas like power electronics can help power the future in exciting and meaningful ways.” 

The SUNY Poly grant is part of a total of $6.9 million in funding that the U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E is providing through its Power Nitride Doping Innovation Offers Devices Enabling SWITCHES (PNDIODES) program to seven institutions and organizations. With PNDIODES, ARPA-E is tackling a specific challenge in wide-bandgap semiconductor production. Wide-bandgap semiconductors are an important area of research because the materials, such as gallium nitride (GaN), allow for electronic devices to operate at higher temperatures and/or frequencies, for example, than current silicon-based computer chips, which is why technical advances in power electronics promise energy efficiency gains throughout the United States economy. Achieving high power conversion efficiency in these systems, however, requires low-loss power semiconductor switches. Power converters based on GaN could potentially meet the challenge by enabling higher voltage devices with improved efficiency—while also dramatically reducing size and weight of the device, for example.

The PNDIODES-funded research focuses on a process called selective area doping, in which a specific impurity is added to a semiconductor to change its electrical properties and achieve performance characteristics that are useful for electronics. Implemented well, this process can allow for the fabrication of devices at a competitive cost compared to their traditional, silicon-based counterparts. Developing a reliable and usable doping process that can be applied to specific regions of GaN and its alloys is an important obstacle in the fabrication of GaN-based power electronics devices that PNDIODES seeks to overcome. Ultimately, the PNDIODES project teams, including the Shahedipour-Sandvik team and Dr. Sung at SUNY Poly as well as the institution’s partners, will develop new ways to build semiconductors for high performance, high-powered applications like aerospace, electric vehicles, and the grid.

Prof. Shahedipour-Sandkvik team’s research, “Demonstration of PN-junctions by ion implantation techniques for GaN (DOPING-GaN),” will focus on ion implantation as the centerpiece of its approach and use new annealing techniques to develop processes to activate implanted silicon or magnesium in GaN to build p-n junctions, which are used to control the flow of electrons within an integrated circuit. Utilizing a unique technique with a gyrotron beam, a high-power vacuum tube that generates millimeter-wave electromagnetic waves, the team’s research aims to understand the impact of implantation on the microstructural properties of the GaN material and its effects on p-n diode performance.

In addition to this GaN-focused research being conducted by Prof. Shahedipour and her team at SUNY Poly, which also provides hands-on research opportunities for a number of the institution’s students, SUNY Poly and General Electric also lead the New York Power Electronics Manufacturing Consortium (NY-PEMC) with the goal of developing and producing low cost, high performance 6″ silicon carbide (SiC) wafers for power electronics applications. The consortium announced its first successful production of SiC-based patterned wafers in February at the Albany NanoTech Complex’s 150mm SiC line, with production coordinated with SUNY Poly’s Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C), located at its Utica campus where the SiC-based power chips will be packaged, a process that combines them with a housing that allows for interconnection with an application.

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AMOLED panel market to surge 63% in 2017

The global active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) panel market is forecast to surge 63 percent in 2017 from a year ago to $25.2 billion on growing demand for AMOLED panels in the smartphone and TV industries, according to IHS Markit (Nasdaq: INFO).

“Growing use of AMOLED panels in smartphones and rising sales of AMOLED TVs will mainly drive the growth of the AMOLED panel market,” said Ricky Park, director of display research at IHS Markit. “A steady rise in demand from head-mount displays and mobile PCs would also prop up the market.”

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The demand for AMOLED displays has rapidly risen in the smartphone market in particular as the flexible substrate allows phones to be produced in various designs with a lighter and slimmer bodies. This year, leading smartphone makers have competitively rolled out premium phones that boast a very narrow bezel or nearly bezel-less designs.

“The AMOLED display market is also expected to get a boost from Apple’s decision to use an AMOLED screen in its iPhone series to be released later this year, and Chinese smartphone makers’ moving to newer applications of AMOLED panels,” Park said. “To meet the burgeoning demand, South Korean and Chinese display makers have been heavily investing in Generation 6 AMOLED fabs.”

According to Display Long-term Demand Forecast Tracker from IHS Markit, the TV industry, the second biggest market for AMOLED panels, will also play a major role in fostering the growth of the AMOLED panel market this year. LG Display, which currently dominates the AMOLED TV panel market, is set to embark on the operation of its second AMOLED TV panel line E4-2 with an aim to mass produce panels in the latter half of this year.

Bumped up by an increase in output, the AMOLED TV panel market is forecast to grow from 890,000 units last year to 1.5 million units this year. By 2021, the AMOLED panel market is projected to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 22 percent to exceed $40 billion.

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