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Scaling Relations and Optimization of Excitonic Energy Transfer Rates between One-Dimensional Molecular Aggregates

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The Journal of Physical Chemistry B
DOI: 10.1021/jp4124502

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Beer lovers tweet what they drink: Twitter maps show Americans’ beer preferences

Researchers who mapped tweets revealed how “beer space” on Twitter reflects real-world preferences of brews and beer brands in the United States. For example, tweet preferences for Bud Light were found in the Eastern half of the US, while preferences for Coors Light originate in the Western half, particularly near Colorado and surrounding states. Other beer spaces included Miller Lite preferences in the Midwest and Great Plains, and brands like Corona and Dos Equis in the Southern border regions of the US.

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Electrical transmission at atomic level: New approach to building signal processing components from individual atoms

In a study on the transport of atoms in ultracold gases, a team of physicists has developed a new approach to how signals might be transmitted at the atomic level. This could be especially important for realizing logic structures with strictly defined functions on the basis of individual atoms, which in turn could find application in transistors or diodes.

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Attention changes in the course of a dog’s life mirror those of humans

Dogs are known to be ‘Man’s best friend’. No other pet has adjusted to human lifestyles as well as this four-legged animal. Scientists have been the first to investigate the evolution of dogs’ attentiveness in the course of their lives and to what extent they resemble humans in this regard. The outcome: dogs’ attentional and sensorimotor control developmental trajectories are very similar to those found in humans.

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Switching brain cells with less light

Networked nerve cells are the control center of organisms. In a nematode, 300 nerve cells are sufficient to initiate complex behavior. To understand the properties of the networks, researchers switch cells on and off with light and observe the resulting behavior of the organism. Scientists now present a protein that facilitates the control of nerve cells by light. It might be used as a basis of studies of diseases of the nervous system.

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Universal syllables: Some innate preferences shape the sound of words from birth

Languages are learned, it’s true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, there are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages.  So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A new study provides evidence to support to this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.

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Higher risk of death from skin cancer among men living alone

There are differences in prognosis in cutaneous malignant melanoma depending on cohabitation status and gender, according to a new study. Single men of all ages are more likely to die of their disease. According to the researchers, one possible explanation could relate to insufficient access to skin examinations.

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Corals don’t lie: Centuries of rising sea levels and temperature data revealed

Scientists have analyzed coral cores from the eastern Indian Ocean to understand how the unique coral reefs of Western Australia are affected by changing ocean currents and water temperatures. The findings give new insights into how La Niña, a climate swing in the tropical Pacific, affects the Leeuwin current and how our oceans are changing.

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For most adolescents, popularity increases risk of getting bullied

For most adolescents, becoming more popular both increases their risk of getting bullied and worsens the negative consequences of being victimized, research shows. “Most people probably would not think that having a higher social status would increase the risk of being targeted, but with few exceptions, that’s what we find,” said the study’s lead author.

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Hospital Readmission Rates Not Reliable Measure of Hospital Quality in Cardiac Surgical Care

Hospital readmission rates are not a reliable measure of hospital quality in cardiac surgical care because they are driven by chance rather than statistically significant measurements, a new study concludes. Overall, the researchers found that readmission rates for the majority of hospitals did not reach a minimum acceptable level of reliability. The researchers also found that hospital case volume is a large determinant of the reliability of readmission rates. The more surgeries a hospital performs per year, the higher the reliability in the readmission rate.

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