Selected RSS news

Light gives enzyme a radical new role

Chemists redeploy reductase enzyme to form lactam rings

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Laser-made graphene enables simple, low-cost nanogenerator

Flexible, stretchable devices could be embedded in clothes and shoes to convert movement into electric power

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Major study finds no conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators

Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced fetal growth.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

The gym proving too expensive or time consuming?

A new study investigated a home-based high-intensity interval training (Home-HIT) program and studied its benefits for clinically obese individuals with an elevated risk of heart disease.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

‘DNA microscopy’ offers entirely new way to image cells

Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules’ relative positions.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Epilepsy and sudden death linked to bad gene

In sudden death in epilepsy, people stop breathing for no apparent reason and die. Now, a group of UConn neuroscientists have a lead as to why. Many neurologists argue that a bad seizure can travel through the brain to cause breathing or heartbeat malfunction, and that’s what kills. But epileptics can die suddenly without having an obvious seizure. Instead, the researchers have evidence a genetic mutation that causes the seizures also disrupts the cells that control breathing.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Advanced NMR captures new details in nanoparticle structures

Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Phenols in cocoa bean shells may reverse obesity-related problems in mouse cells

A new study suggests that three of the phenolic compounds in cocoa bean shells have powerful effects on the fat and immune cells in mice, potentially reversing the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Largest study of CTE finds it in 6% of subjects

Nearly 6% of athletes and non-athletes were found to have the neurodegenerative disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the largest, and broadest, study conducted of the disease to date. Kevin F. Bieniek, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio is the lead author.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Sugars that coat proteins are a possible drug target for pancreatitis

CA19-9 is a complex sugar structure that coats proteins. Elevated levels of CA19-9 was found to cause inflammation in the pancreas in mice and promote rapid progression to pancreatic cancer. By neutralizing the functions of CA19-9 with antibodies, researchers were able to reduce and even prevent pancreatic damage in animal models.

VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.17_1161]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Username: 0...